success stories toolkit
Jessica Reynolds

Jessica Reynolds

Month of June – Success Stories

A new month means a new theme for Urban Planners Queensland [UPQ]. In June we are celebrating all things duplex and dual occupancy!

Dual occupancy and duplex tend to fall under the same definition in SEQ local planning schemes, being “the use of a premises containing two dwellings on one lot (whether or not attached) for separate households”. Dual occupancies are perfect for flood affected sites and increasing dwelling density on sites with existing character housing (which limit vehicle access and parking).

success story one

This dual occupancy approval on a 412m2 site involved the retention of a pre-1911 dwelling at the front of the site and a new dwelling to the rear. The site was originally flagged by Council for further increased dwelling density (3 units) given it neighboured a 3 storey brick apartment complex and was in a well serviced location. Unfortunately, since the release of the Brisbane Future Blueprint, Council have been refusing to accept Multiple Unit Dwellings [MUDs] on sites below 600m2. Our client decided that the dual occupancy approval would be more appropriate to their circumstances than a planning and environment court appeal.

success story two

Back in 2016 UPQ obtained development approval for 5 units on this 694m2 site. The developer sold on the site and the project came back to UPQ in 2018 from a Sydney developer after the 2017 purchaser failed to obtain a subdivision approval with another consultant. The site is affected by overland flow, as such Brisbane City Council require 300m2 of flood free land to allow subdivision. As the entire site was flood affected the only option to obtain 2 dwellings on-site was to propose a dual occupancy with all vehicle movement areas and access ramped above the overland flow.

success story three

This beach side dual occupancy was approved on the Sunshine Coast. The proposal involved constructing a new dwelling forward of the existing house. This project was interesting because it proposed a dwelling density below Council’s expectations for its residential zoning. UPQ managed to get this one across the line as an interim use noting that upon the site being potentially amalgamated in future, the site could still readily be re-development for 9+ storey apartments.

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